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Immigration Attorneys

An attorney is a person who advises his clients on legal matters and represents them in the courts of law. A US immigration attorney deals with issues concerning foreign nationals who enter the U.S either temporarily or permanently. Their line of work involves everything associated with the legal rights, duties, and obligations of foreigners in the United States. Immigration attorneys also deal with the application process and procedures involved in neutralizing foreigners who want to become US citizens. They deal with legal issues related to refugees or asylees, people who cross US borders illegally and people that illegally transport these people.

American immigration law is very complicated. It is constantly changing. An immigration lawyer will be able to help with issues such as obtaining a U.S. work visa or other type of visa or a green card. They are also able to assist on issues concerning naturalization, immigrating to the US for education, adopting a child from another country, gaining asylum in the US and other immigration matters. Consulting an immigration attorney ensures that a clients immigration matters are handled in the best way possible. Immigration attorneys keep themselves updated about the changing rules and regulations of American immigration law. An immigration law attorney can help a person overcome and avoid many legal issues.

In certain cases, lawyers only guide their clients and provide the basic legal consultation, which the client can afford. Most often, in such cases, lawyers do not represent their clients in court. Organizations like the American Bar Association have gladly accepted the concept although this practice is still controversial in some segments of the legal fraternity. A person can find names of immigration lawyers specializing in immigration law in the Internet yellow pages. Alternatively, state Bar Associations can also provide referrals. The INS employees at the local office may also assist immigrants.

Source: www.coolimmigration.com