HomeHome SitemapSitemap Contact usContacts

Michigan Immigration Lawyers

The U.S. has the maximum number of immigrants in the world. Michigan immigration lawyers, like other immigration lawyers in the U.S., play an important role in protecting the rights of the immigrants. Immigration lawyers have gained importance because of the increase in the number of illegal immigrants. Many times they help the immigrants from communist countries gain asylum. They also help prevent the deportation of some immigrants, who are ignorant of their rights, especially those who are illiterate.

The United States Immigration and Nationality Act were created in 1952. Before 1952, a number of statutes governed the immigration laws. However, the statutes existed as parts of different acts and were not organized in one location. Therefore, with a view to create a unified law applicable to this important issue, the McCarran-Walter bill of 1952, Public Law No. 82-414, collected the applicable statutes, codified the existing provisions and reorganized the structure of immigration law.

Any individual or entity in the United States can choose to be represented by an attorney or accredited representative when filing applications or petitions with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Once chosen by an individual or entity, the representative has to inform the authority in a prescribed format, along with the application or petition. In matters filed within the United States, only attorneys and accredited representatives are allowed to communicate on behalf of the individual, to the USCIS and receive information from USCIS regarding the individual's application or petition.

If the individual needs legal advice about an immigration matter but cannot afford to hire a lawyer, Michigan state bar association can provide assistance regarding the availability, of free or reduced cost legal services. Such legal advice can also be made available to persons seeking asylum under the U.N. Convention on Human Rights. The lawyer must be a member in good standing of the "bar" of Michigan State and should not be under any court order, restricting practice of law.

Source: coolimmigration.com